News Search

FILTER:
trusted care
Clear

News Comments Updated
Maj. Kisha Wood, a medic with the 375th Medical Group based at Scott Air Force Base, assists an elderly patient after Hurricane Maria at Henry E. Rohlsen Airport, near Christiansted, St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands Sept. 24, 2017. Wood was part of a U.S. Air Force En Route Patient Staging System team that deployed to St. Croix to help evacuate patients off the island. The team created an aeromedical evacuation staging area for patients to evacuate, fostering a safe environment. (Photo by Lt. Col. Elizabeth Anderson-Doze) Trusted Care brought order to chaos after Hurricane Maria
Soon after hurricanes struck the Caribbean and southern U.S. in the fall of 2017, Air Force medics deployed to the island of St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands and brought along their Trusted Care culture to help evacuate patients safely and effectively from the storm ravaged island.
0 3/22
2018
Staff Sgt Alyson Venegas, Senior Airmen Linda Wilson, and Senior Airman Logan Bennett, 99th Medical Group Aerospace Medical Technicians, stand with CMSgt Steven Cum, Chief, Medical Enlisted Force (CMEF) and Enlisted Corps Chief, Office of the Surgeon General. U.S. Air Force, CMSgt Tracy Washington, and CMSgt John Yun at Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nev., March 1, 2018. Venegas, Wilson, and Bennett attended the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas, Nev., Oct. 1, 2017, when a gunman opened fire on concert-goers, causing the deadliest mass casualty incident in modern American history. While under continuous fire, Venegas, Wilson, and Bennett provided lifesaving trauma interventions to victims of the mass casualty shooting. (U.S. Air Force photo) Three Nellis Air Force Base Airmen display bravery and heroism during the tragic Las Vegas shooting
On Oct. 1, 2017, a gunman opened fire on concert-goers attending the 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas, Nev., killing 58 and injuring 450 people. Amid the chaos and confusion, three Air Force medics attending the concert leapt into action.
0 3/06
2018
The “Trusted Care” badge serves as a reminder for the entire U.S. Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) to provide exemplary patient-centered care at every level. In order to ensure the patient is placed at the center of their care, Trusted Care has teamed up with the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI) to develop an effective training program. Training is aimed at fostering a culture of safety from front-line providers to senior leaders. (U.S. Air Force photo by SSgt Jensen Stidham) Strengthening Trusted Care culture in Air Force medicine
On October 26th, 2017, over 130 leaders across various health care organizations gathered to listen to Col. Christian Lyons and Lt. Col. Michael Fea speak on Trusted Care’s aim of positioning the Air Force Medical Service as a high reliability organization.
0 1/30
2018
Then Airmen First Class Nicole Moore, a medical technician stationed at Joint Base San Antonio – Lackland, was one of the first responders treating patients after the attack at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan on Nov 12, 2016. As a recipient of the 2017 Outstanding Airman of the Year award, Moore was recognized for her dedication to the principles of patient-centered Trusted Care. (Courtesy photo) Airman proves the importance of mission readiness on Trusted Care
November 12, 2016 began as another normal day at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan for Senior Airman Nicole Moore. That day was anything but normal.
0 1/26
2018
MSgt Ashley Strong, U.S. Air Force dental flight chief out of Schriever Air Force Base, was a recipient of the 2017 Outstanding Airman of the Year award and was recognized for her dedication to efficiency and patient satisfaction (Courtesy photo). Airman upholds the Trusted Care principles through the delivery of efficient care and patient satisfaction
For U.S. Air Force MSgt Ashley Strong, delivering patient-centered Trusted Care is more than a policy. For this Air Force dental flight chief, Trusted Care is about using the expertise and experiences of all Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) Airmen at every level to find better ways to provide quality, patient-centered care.
0 1/23
2018
U.S. Air Force Medical Service Corps Officer, Maj. Stephanie Proellochs (center), works with two of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center’s physical therapists in Bethesda, MD, Nov. 8, 2017. Kyla Dunlavey (right) and Alyssa Olsen (left) work with the rest of Proellochs’ medical team throughout her amputation recovery.  Proellochs was diagnosed with a metastatic tumor in her left foot in January 2017, which resulted in having her foot amputated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis) Living with an attitude of gratitude – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 3)
“I already got my running blade,” said an enthusiastic Maj. Stephanie Proellochs (PRE’-locks). After only taking her first steps in November, Proellochs, a U.S. Air Force Medical Service Corps (MSC) Officer and recent amputee, was already thinking of how she would be able to run and eventually snowboard with her family.
0 1/10
2018
Maj. Stephanie Proellochs carefully inspects her leg and prosthesis after a round of physical therapy exercises at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Nov. 15, 2017. Proellochs underwent an amputation as a result of a malignant tumor that spread. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis) Embracing the uncharted life as an amputee – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 2)
Maj. Stephanie Proellochs (PRE’-locks), a recent amputee, gazes up at the rock climbing wall at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center’s physical therapy center in Bethesda, Maryland. She recalled the time she witnessed a Service member who had lost his arm effortlessly climb his way to the top.
0 12/27
2017
RSS