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  • Resilient kids, ready Airmen

    One thing Airmen worry about when they deploy is the well-being of their family, especially children who may have a hard time coping with the challenges that come with a parent’s deployment.The impact of deployment on children is a key component of Airmen readiness. Knowing their family is well

  • Active shooter training conducted at medical group

    When the 72nd Medical Group in Bldg. 1094 at Tinker Air Force Base closed for monthly training Aug. 15, several forces on base jumped into action.Maj. Denise Zona, mental health flight commander, with moulage makeup forming a neck wound and fake blood splattered onto the front and back of her

  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty.One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.

  • Baltimore C-STARS partnership prepares Airmen for battlefield medicine

    Civilian partnerships are a vital readiness resource for the Air Force Medical Service, refreshing medics on trauma skills and taking lessons learned to deliver life-saving trauma care downrange.The Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills program in Baltimore, Maryland, prepares

  • A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care

    Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.

  • A peak behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas

    Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment

  • Air Force lab puts medical devices through their paces

    “We break stuff,” said Lt. Col. Brandi Ritter, chief of the Air Force Medical Evaluation Support Activity, showing off the facility where her unit tests the devices medical Airmen use to complete their mission.

  • Strengthening Trusted Care culture in Air Force medicine

    On October 26th, 2017, over 130 leaders across various health care organizations gathered to listen to Col. Christian Lyons and Lt. Col. Michael Fea speak on Trusted Care’s aim of positioning the Air Force Medical Service as a high reliability organization.